Searching Scripture

by Kevin Vogts

It is unfortunate that when we hear the word stewardship the first thing that comes to mind for most modern Christians is money.  Biblically speaking, money is only one part of a life of Christian stewardship.

According to Rom. 6:23, what do we all deserve from God on account of our sins?  But instead, what is the best gift that He gives us?

_______________________________

_______________________________

Using bookends at the beginning and end of 2 Cor. 5:15, how does this verse describe what God’s Son did to merit this gift for us?  In between these bookends, what phrase sums up our response to His love and the essence of Christian stewardship?  For whom do we no longer live?  For whom do we now live instead?  Why this change of focus in our lives?

_______________________________

_______________________________

According to Eph. 4:7–8, what has Christ given to each one of us, and how is this determined?

_______________________________

_______________________________

The New Testament gives several lists of the gifts God’s people receive for service to Him.  However, these are not exhaustive.  What are the gifts listed in these verses: Eph. 4:11; Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10; 1 Cor. 12:28-31?

_______________________________

_______________________________

In Parable of the Talents in Matt. 25:14-30, Jesus explains the temporary nature of the gifts entrusted to us by God and how we are to use them for His service. Who does the Master in the parable represent?  The servants?

_______________________________

_______________________________

A talent was an ancient measure for precious metals, about 75 pounds.  The modern usage of talent to describe other kinds of gifts and abilities is actually derived from this parable.  What do the talents in the parable represent?

_______________________________

_______________________________

In ancient times, a steward was a servant who was entrusted by his master with caring for his property, not using it for his own benefit but for that of his master.  Consider Joseph, a steward first for Potiphar over his household and then for Pharaoh over all of Egypt (Gen. 39:4–6; Gen. 41:38–44).

We use the word stewardship to describe this use of the talents–of every kind–entrusted to us by our Master.  How does Paul describe himself and the other apostles, and all called into Christ’s ministry up to our day, in 1 Cor. 4:1?  How can pastors be good stewards of this special trust they have received?

_______________________________

_______________________________

Harking back to the Parable of the Talents, what does 1 Cor. 4:2 say that all of us as stewards–of whatever we have been entrusted with–are to be?

_______________________________

_______________________________

Regarding the stewardship of material possessions and contributing to support the work of Christ’s Church, what does Paul advise in 1 Cor. 16:2; 2 Cor. 9:7?

_______________________________

_______________________________

Stewardship does indeed include money and other material possessions, which is an important part of being a good steward of God’s gifts.  But biblically speaking, money is only one part of a life of Christian stewardship.  God has entrusted much to you, a faithful steward for Him!

May 2011

The Lutheran Witness — Providing Missouri Synod laypeople with stories and information that
complement congregational life, foster personal growth in faith, and help interpret the
contemporary world from a Lutheran Christian perspective.

Comments are closed.
LCMS News & Information